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Glue Gun Eggs (Click thumbnails for larger images)

Materials & Tools:

Hot glue gun & glue

Small dish of cold water

Craft Knife

Stage 1

Wait until the glue gun is up to temperature, then carefully squeeze the trigger until a single drop of glue forms. Drip the glue into the cold water.

Stage 2

Carefully trim the "string" from the end of the blob of glue, leaving a roughly egg-shaped blob.

 

More Eggs (Click thumbnails for larger images)

Materials & Tools:

Modelling Clay

Peppercorns

Silica Gel Beads

Type 1

Roll modelling clay into small balls.

Type 2

Roll modelling clay into tapered cylinders with rounded ends. These look like the eggs of some dinosaurs - e.g. oviraptor.

Type 3

Roll modelling clay into a larger ball, then gently squash one end to form a shape like a small chicken egg. This one is about the right size for a small dragon egg.

Type 4

I couldn't resist attempting an Alien egg.

Type 5

White peppercorns are smooth, and are a pretty good size for eggs.

Type 6

Dried black peppercorns make more unusual-looking eggs with their rough surface patterns.

Type 7

Silica gel beads are commonly found in small packets added to electrical items to absorb moisture. They make great translucent eggs, but don't get them wet!

   

 

Nests from scouring pads (Click thumbnails for larger images)

Materials & Tools:

Scouring pad

PVA

Sharp scissors

Needle-nose Pliers or Forceps

Eggs (optional)

Stage 1

Using the scissors, cut a rough circle from the scouring pad to the size you want your nest.

Stage 2

Using the pliers or forceps, pluck bits from the centre of the circle, and also around the outside edge to leave a rough finish.

Stage 3

Spray the piece black.

Stage 4

Drybrush a mid brown colour to bring out the texture of the pad.

Stage 5

Here is the finished nest with white peppercorns added for eggs. You can glue the nest to the model, or leave it as a separate feature.

 

Here is a much smaller nest made using the same techniques, but the central hole doesn't go so deep.

 

A rough drybrush on the scourer brings out the texture. The eggs are tiny silica gel beads painted in a light blue colour.

 

   

Scrape Nests (Click thumbnails for larger images)

Materials & Tools:

Hot Glue Gun & Glue

Base material

PVA

Paint Brush

Sand

Eggs (optional)

Stage 1

Apply hot glue to the base in a rough circle. Build up a couple of layers to create a doughnut shape.

Stage 2

Paint the whole base with PVA glue, and then cover it in sand. Weigh down the edges of the base and leave to dry.

 

Stage 3

If you wish, you can prime and paint the sand to match other terrain pieces - I left mine unpainted.

Stage 4

Carefully glue eggs into position in the nest using PVA. These ones are modelling clay rolled into tapered cylinders to resemble some type of dinosaur eggs.

 

Is this the mother returning to tend the nest, or an egg thief looking for an easy meal?

Spider Nests / Cocoons (Click thumbnails for larger images)

Materials & Tools:

Cotton Bud

PVA

Paint Brush

Scissors

Stage 1

Pull the ball of cotton wool from the plastic shaft of the cotton bud. A cotton bud is a good size and has a nice rounded end, so it is much simpler than starting with a cotton ball.

Stage 2

Cut the cotton ball to the length you require.

Stage 3

Twist the end of the cotton ball which was attached to the plastic, and pull out a strand of cotton.

Stage 4

Apply some PVA glue to the trailing strand of cotton.

Stage 5 

Apply a blob of PVA to the model where you want the nest to hang and secure the end of the strand of cotton in place.

Spider Nests #2 (Click thumbnails for larger images)

Materials & Tools:

Wet Wipe

PVA

Paint Brush

Scissors

Stage 1

Wash the wet wipe in soapy water and rinse, then leave to dry.

Stage 2

Pull a section of material from the sheet, a little larger than you want to make the nest.

Stage 3

Turn the piece of material in your hand and pull a small amount off the edges all the way around, especially on any straight sections. You should end up with a fairly random shape with trailing strands all around the edges.

Stage 4

Apply some PVA glue to the trailing strands of cotton.

Stage 5 

Hold the nest roughly in place where you want to attach it, and brush more PVA onto the ends of the strands to attach them. Work around the nest and try to keep a little tension in each of the strands.

Wolf Spider Nests (Click thumbnails for larger images)

Materials & Tools:

Wet Wipe

PVA

Paint Brush

Pencil

Drill & Drill Bits (optional)

Stage 1

Wash the wet wipe in soapy water and rinse, then leave to dry.

Stage 2

Pull a section of material from the sheet, a little larger than you want to make the nest.

Stage 3

Turn the piece of material in your hand and pull a small amount off the edges all the way around, especially on any straight sections. You should end up with a fairly random shape with trailing strands all around the edges.

Stage 4

If you are modelling on foam, make a hole with the point of the pencil, otherwise drill a suitable hole in your base. Paint a dark colour inside the hole and allow this to dry.

Stage 5 

Place the wet wipe material in place, and push the pencil into the hole through the material. You will probably have to remove the piece in order to push the pencil right through.

Stage 6 

Replace the material over the hole, and apply PVA to each of the trailing strands, attaching them to the base. Work your way all around the piece.

 

Stage 7

Press the pencil gently into the hole once more, forcing the material down, then twist and carefully remove it.

 

 

The finished result.

 

Molehills (Click thumbnails for larger images)

Materials & Tools:

Plaster of Paris or similar

Custom Scenics Applicator

Atomiser or pipette

Paints & brushes

Stage 1

Molehills occur on many types of terrain, but are most obvious on short grass like lawns or grazed pasture. Finish an area of terrain with flock & static grass where you wish to add the molehills.

Stage 2

Add some small piles of plaster where you want the molehills using a precision applicator, or a folded piece of card.

Stage 3

Mist over the plaster with water from the atomiser, or drip a couple of drops carefully onto each pile of plaster from the pipette. Leave to set and dry, then gently brush away any excess.

Stage 4

Paint the plaster in earth tones - I used thin washes of black and dark brown on mine, but the colour should match any other bare earth patches on your model.

Stage 5

Paint highlights on the molehills if you wish. Add more flock or static grass to any areas that may need it, before sealing everything with watered down PVA.

Swallow Nests (Click thumbnails for larger images)

Materials & Tools:

Modelling Clay

Craft Knife

Flock

PVA

Paint & Brushes

Stage 1

Roll out a cylinder of modelling clay about 6mm or 1/4" in diameter. Round off one end of the cylinder, and flatten one side of it against a base-board.

Stage 2

Cut the end from the clay with a knife.

You should end up with a shape that is slightly larger than a quarter sphere. You can indent the top of the nest slightly if it will be seen. Allow the clay to harden and dry.

Stage 3

Paint PVA over the outside of the nests and sprinkle fine flock all over. This is to add a fine texture to the surface, so the colour is unimportant. Leave to dry thoroughly.

Stage 4

Paint all the exposed surfaces of the nest in an earth-brown colour, and highlight if you like.

Stage 5

Fix the nests to your model with PVA. Swallows usually nest beneath the eaves, or high in the rafters of a building with an open doorway or broken window.

Wasps Nests (Click thumbnails for larger images)

Materials & Tools:

Modelling Clay

Cocktail Stick or similar

PVA

Paint & Brushes

Stage 1

Roll a piece of modelling clay into an egg shape. Real wasps nests can get about as big as a basketball, but fantasy ones could be much larger.

Stage 2

Push the tip of a cocktail stick to make a hole in the clay near the more pointed end of the egg. Allow the clay to harden and dry.

Stage 3

Paint a dark brown or black colour inside the hole, and the rest of the nest in a light to mid-brown colour. Allow the paint to dry.

Stage 4

Attach the nest to your model using PVA glue. In nature, wasps nests are usually found hanging beneath some kind of shelter - a tree branch, the roof of a building or overhanging rocks, for example.

   

 


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